Watch your customers’ mental bandwidth

In customer experience, we care a lot about making customers happy and are having a close eye on NPS, CS and others. Those measures are then used to judge the impact of a single communication or service measure upon the customer. In large corporations, these “single” touch points with the customer can add up massively, when departments don’t align what they do. This is when a customer gets three letters from the same company that suggest four ways of getting an issue resolved. One from sales, one from service and the last one from the logistics department. So shouldn’t we first determine our customers’ mental bandwidth and how much of that bandwidth they grant us?

Your product or service is not the center of the world

You all know the drill. Your job and the industry you are working in is the most important thing for you during daytime – and sometimes also after having returned to your home and family. But what about your customers? Ask yourself how important the product or service you are providing is for your average customers? Check how much time a customer spends every day, consciously using your product or service. Assessed with Herzberg’s Motivator-Hygiene theory in mind, where does your product or service belong to?

Customer bandwidth has become a scarce resource

Now, wipe the tears from your eyes if you have realized that your center of gravity falls into your customers’ “hygiene” bucket. Your are in good company. There is a lot of noise out there and every company tries to grab the customers’ attention. Our customers on the other side have only a limited bandwidth for us as they also need to care for their work, their family and all other things that are in their “motivator” bucked to use that analogy again.

Mind the context and you will be relevant

For a customer experience professional that means that the context the customer is in is very relevant. Ask yourself how much bandwidth a customer will have in the situation that you are designing your service for. Will there have been noise before entering the respective service stage? How much time do you allow for the action/ transaction to happen? How much information do you provide for ask from your customers? Will the customer be on top of things or is the situation new for her?

If you thoroughly go through your service design and design for minimum bandwidth use with minimum distraction before and after, you have a good chance of getting your message across and providing an excellent customer experience that does not leave any open questions to your customer.

(Image by Jacob Earl)